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Tanya Asim Cooper

Assistant Clinical Professor of Law
Director Restoration and Justice Clinic
School of Law

Biography

Tanya Asim Cooper serves as Director of the Restoration and Justice Clinic and Assistant Clinical Professor of Law.

Professor Cooper's research focuses on domestic violence in the Christian Church. Together with her research colleagues, Dr. Roslyn M. Satchel (Seaver College) and Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis (Graduate School of Education and Psychology), Professor Cooper has received over $100,000 in grant funding from Pepperdine University to support their project, Domestic Violence in the American Christian Church: Current Trends & Effective Resources. In 2017, they hosted an inter-disciplinary conference, In Search of Sanctuary: Strengthening the Church's Response to Intimate Partner Violence. In 2018, Professor Cooper received a fellowship to attend the Summer Research Institute at Harris Manchester College in the University of Oxford.

Previously, Professor Cooper taught at the University of Alabama School of Law, where she directed the Domestic Violence Law Clinic. While in Alabama, she chaired a county-wide domestic violence task force, responsible for coordinating local domestic violence agencies, shelters, courts and law enforcement, and providing holistic services to victims.

Professor Cooper has also taught at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, where she supervised student attorneys in a wide variety of family law cases before administrative, trial, and appellate courts. Together with her law students and colleagues, Professor Cooper helped reunify families and engaged in systems change and community organizing to improve DC's child welfare system.

Before teaching, Professor Cooper practiced at The Children's Law Center in Washington, DC. She represented indigent children in abuse, neglect, adoption, guardianship, and custody cases; parents in special education, custody, housing and public benefits cases; child witnesses in civil and criminal child abuse cases; and she advocated for neglected children in juvenile delinquency and special education matters. She is a certified child welfare law specialist (DC & Alabama).

Professor Cooper's scholarship addresses: relationship violence in collegiate Greek life, child victim-witness testimony, copyright and art law, and racial bias in American foster care. Her research has been cited by legal scholars, students, and practitioners as well as the California legislature, the National Crime Victim Law Institute, and the ABA Criminal Justice Section. Excerpts of her articles have been reprinted in the casebook, Children and the Law: Doctrine, Policy and Practice (6th ed.), and on websites, including Race, Racism and the Law.

Professor Cooper serves as editor of the Clinical Legal Education Association newsletter and is a contributing editor for the Clinical Law Prof Blog. She also serves on the School of Law's Council for Diversity and Inclusion.

Professor Cooper is an active member of the California and DC bars, and was a member of the Alabama State Bar from 2013-2015. She is married to Stephen Alexander Cooper, a lawyer and writer.

Education

  • LL.M., University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, 2012
  • J.D., American University Washington College of Law, 2002
  • M.A., Boston University, 1997
  • B.A., Boston University, 1996

Book Chapters

Articles

Popular Press

Topics

  • Family Law
  • Intellectual Property
  • Clinical Law